New Urban Planning PGOU Approved for Málaga

25 November 2017 – Diario Sur

Following the annulment of the PGOU approved in 2010, the route map towards the normalisation of urban planning in Marbella has taken a step forward with the initial approval of some new urban planning rules. The latest document seeks to “update” the plan approved in 1986, which is still valid now and which will serve as the basis for drafting the new PGOU that the city needs. The process, which was approved by the plenary with votes in favour from the government’s team (PP and OSP) and the PSOE, and votes against from IU and Costa del Sol Sí Puede, must now be completed with text from the provincial delegation of the Junta’s Environment Board, prior to the issuance of a mandatory report. Subsequently, it will be presented to the plenary again for definitive approval (…).

In practice, and as the councillor for Land Planning, María Francisca Caracuel, explained, modifications have been made to the framework, amongst others, “which affect many homes” and which mean that “extensions, improvements and renovations will now be allowed” on buildings that were left out of the guidelines after the 2010 plan was annulled.

Another change will affect plots of land, for which it is not currently possible to grant construction licences because no approved urban planning projects exist, in accordance with the plan approved in 1986 “even though, in reality, they are already partially developed”. In these cases, the common rules open the door for the plots to be developed, by submitting an urbanisation work project “which is less complex and which can be processed in less time”.

The new rules will authorise hospitality use on the first floors of homes in the Casco Antiguo (Old Town) and will allow hotel establishments to expand their facilities onto adjoining plots even if the use of those sites is not strictly for hotel purposes (…).

Established urban plots

In the field of urban planning, the plenary also ratified (with votes in favour from the government team, against from IU and CSSP, and abstentions from the PSOE) the proposal made by the Councillor for Land Planning to incorporate established urban plots into the urban development plans, after they have been declared as such by binding legal rulings, administrative declarations, own acts, plenary agreements or by the Local Government. The councillor insisted that, given that it does not require any structural changes, there is no need for the document to be subjected to a new public consultation period, as had been requested by the other municipal groups.

In other matters, the municipal corporation also gave the green light, unanimously, to the proposal from the deputy mayor of San Pedro Alcántara, Rafael Piña (…) to begin the paperwork for the construction of a new secondary school in the south of San Pedro (…).

Finally, the plenary also approved, amongst other items, a proposal from IU to create a network of roads to connect the urbanisations between Bello Horizonte and Elviria, to form a 10km network that will offer a safe alternative to the A-7 motorway, which is “always packed and dangerous”.

Original story: Diario Sur (by Mónica Pérez)

Translation: Carmel Drake

Sevilla’s Population Will Exceed 700,000 Again Thanks To Aedas Homes

8 November 2017 – Sevilla ABC

The new neighbourhood of Hacienda del Rosario, in the east of Sevilla, will raise the census of the city above 700,000 inhabitants once again, thanks to the investment being made by Aedas Homes, which has rescued more than 33,000 m2 of developable land next to the Parsi industrial estate that had been blocked since the start of the crisis. As El Confidencial revealed in February, the Town Hall managed to free up this land, which had been left for dead since the property developer Gabrial Rojas gave up on its construction, and granted all of the permits necessary for Aedas to carry out the construction of a complex comprising 1,047 homes, divided into seven urbanisations. This project had been one of the city council’s priorities since Juan Ignacio Zoido took office and in the end, thanks to the investment from this business group in which the US fund Castlelake holds a stake, it will go ahead, to fulfil the urban development plan designed by the Town Hall, which is seeking to continue to grow the city to the east, the most populated area of the Andalucían capital.

The construction of the first phase is already quite advanced and, according to reports from Aedas, the properties are being sold a quite a fast rate. So much so that they have now started to sell the second phase. The intention is that the new neighbourhood will be completed in its entirety over the next three years.

The Jardines Hacienda Rosario residential complex covers the area from the Parsi industrial estate to the Decathlon in Alcalá de Guadaíra (…). One of its key features is its common areas. In fact, the proposal of Aedas Homes is to build a park measuring 33,000 m2 in private free spaces, as well as a social club, a children’s play area, sports courts, padel courts, a swimming pool for children and another one for adults.

In total, seven buildings are going to be constructed in successive phases with these characteristics, which means that, by the end of the process, there will be 4,000 additional residents in the area (…).

Construction of the first phase of Jardines Hacienda Rosario has been awarded to the construction firm San José and Banco Santander is the entity that is financing the development for the construction of these multi-family homes, measuring between 96 m2 and 125 m5 each. The total investment amounts to €100 million.

The price of the homes will range between €115,000 and €130,000 (…). Moreover, the Town Hall also plans to build 802 social housing properties on the site, which will make La Hacienda del Rosario one of the city’s largest neighbourhoods, with almost 2,000 properties, occupying a total surface area of 460,000 m (…).

All of this should be considered in the context that next to Hacienda del Rosario, other developments are also being built at the moment, such as Hacienda San Antonio and Residencial La Plata (…).

According to the most recent official data from INE, the city of Sevilla currently has 690,566 inhabitants, although the Town Hall elevates that figure to 698,690 (…). If Sevilla were to have more than 700,000 inhabitants once again, the revenues it receives from the State would increase substantially (…).

Original story: Sevilla ABC (by Alberto García Reyes)

Translation: Carmel Drake

Ministry Of Dev’t: New Home Permits Soared By 17% In 2016

4 January 2017 – Expansión

Moreover, loans to build new homes have grown by 37%, despite the tightening of controls by the banks.

A decade later, the cranes are back on the skyline of Spain’s major cities once again. The economic improvement and return of credit to the property sector boosted the construction of new homes by 17% in 2016, according to the construction permit statistics published by the Ministry of Development.

The growth was driven by a 37% increase in the financing granted to construction companies and property developers, which received €1,025 million between January and October, according to the General College of Notaries. The banks have now digested the majority of the toxic assets left over from the bubble and are opening the credit tap to the construction sector once again, albeit including more restrictions and controls to avoid repeating the errors of the past.

On the one hand, in most cases, financial institutions are demanding that 80% of developments are pre-sold before the construction of any new buildings can begin. Moreover, the banks are requiring project monitoring to audit the execution of the work and, in the same sense, a more detailed control of the clients that choose to buy properties.

With the money loaned by the banks, property developers and cooperatives have started to design buildings aimed at capturing the demand for new homes that exists in the market. “Clients believe that the worst of the crisis is over and that prices are not going to decrease any further. Moreover, financing conditions for buyers are unique given the low level of Euribor”, explains Daniel Cuevo, Chairman of the Association of Property Developers in Madrid (Asprima).

But the doors to the new real estate market have not been opened to everyone. Most of the new homes sold are “reposition” properties, in other words, they are properties that replace homes that have become too old or too small for their occupants. Young people are finding it the hardest to form their own homes, due to the high rate of youth unemployment, the level of wages and the instability in the market. (…).

In total, during the first ten months of 2016, 16,043 permits were requested to build new homes. The sector expects to reach the 20,000 permit threshold by the end of the year, a figure that exceeds the number of permits requested in 2015 by 17%, but which is still well below the 113,000 permits requested in 2006, a record year, at the height of the real estate bubble. (…).

On the other hand, the new homes that are being built post-crisis are not the same as those that were built during the boom years. Now, property developers are designing buildings with three-bedroom homes that cost the same as a two-bedroom home back in 2006. Urbanisations, which become so fashionable at the beginning of the century, are also back in demand. “People want homes with padel courts and a swimming pool, plus they now also want specific spaces to celebrate parties for children and adults”, explains the President of Asprima. In total, the Ministry of Development granted 1,175 permits to build urbanisations in Spain during the ten months to October 2016.

The increase in property construction has been accompanied by more transactions involving land. The number of land purchases by companies recorded an average growth rate of 23% during the nine months to September 2016, across the country as a whole. In certain regions, such as Madrid, the increase during the first three quarters of the year amounted to 135%. (…).

The improvement in new build construction work also extended to renovations. Thousands of households took advantage of the economic recovery to undertake home improvements and even to extend their properties. Thus, during the first 10 months of 2016, 21,801 requests were filed to renovate or restore homes, up by 2.1% compared to a year earlier. Meanwhile, demand for permits to extend homes soared by 39%, to 1,634. (…).

Original story: Expansión (by Victor Martínez)

Translation: Carmel Drake