Temprano Capital Appoints Livensa Living to Help with Marketing, Sales & Operations

22 April 2019 – Press Release

Temprano Capital Partners, in partnership with CPA®:18 – Global and Carey European Student Housing Fund I, LP, has appointed Livensa Living, powered by CRM Students, to undertake marketing, sales and operations for their openings in 2019 in Barcelona and Porto.

Livensa Living is an Iberian based sales and marketing platform focused on student accommodation.

CRM Students is a leading, international student accommodation manager operating over 50 student residences, totalling more than 23,000 beds.

With this appointment, Temprano Capital Partners, as developer and co-investor with CPA®:18 – Global for Barcelona and Carey European Student Housing Fund I, LP for Porto, aims to provide best in class management solutions and student experiences across its growing portfolio of operating assets.

Temprano Capital Partners currently comprises a portfolio of 10 projects, either operating or under development, across Iberia’s best university cities and 3,500 rooms. It aims to double this number over 3 years.

CPA®:18 – Global and Carey European Student Housing Fund I, LP are currently developing 8,500 beds across 19 properties in Spain and Portugal.

Both projects, Livensa Living U. Porto Campus and Livensa Living Barcelona Diagonal Alto, will be inaugurated in September 2019.

Livensa Living Barcelona Diagonal Alto, acquired in 2017, benefits from a privileged location 10 minutes from UB Barcelona University and UPC via a 24/7 tram service and adjacent to the Finistrelles Shopping Centre. This location will allow the residence to address the unsatisfied accommodation needs of students studying at various universities and educational facilities in Barcelona.

The project will have 372 premium studios in a 10,500 sqm building. In addition to its superior common areas, the property has an incredible roof terrace which will include a chill-out area, a secret garden, an open-air gym and yoga space, a premium bar, an outdoor concert stage and an infinity swimming pool benefitting from amazing, panoramic views across the city of Barcelona.

Livensa Living Porto Campus, also acquired in 2017, is located on Rua Dr. Manuel Pereira da Silva in Porto. It is strategically located in Asprela´s University Campus accounting for approximately 75% of all university students in Porto. The residence is located next to the metro station Universidade making it a superbly connected site.

The project will provide 580 premium studios in a building of two wings 20,000 sqm with a large landscaped central courtyard housing a landscaped garden, a gym and yoga area, a large terrace with bar and a swimming pool.

Original story: Press Release

Edited by: Carmel Drake

Greystar, AXA IM–Real Assets & GIP Buy Spanish Student Housing Provider Resa

7 December 2017 – PE Hub

Greystar Real Estate Partners has acquired Spain-based Resa, a student accommodation provider. The acquisition was made via a joint venture partnership that includes AXA Investment Managers – Real Assets and CBRE Global Investment Partners. No financial terms were disclosed.

Greystar Real Estate Partners (“Greystar”), a global leader in the investment, development, and management of rental housing properties, closed today, through a joint venture (“JV”) partnership, on the acquisition of Resa, the largest student accommodation provider in Spain. The JV includes AXA Investment Managers – Real Assets (“AXA IM – Real Assets”) and CBRE Global Investment Partners (GIP), both acting on behalf of clients, who have acquired the substantial majority holding in the portfolio in equal sized shares, while Greystar has bought the remaining balance and will act as property, development and asset manager for the portfolio. The deal is the largest investment transaction in student housing on the Iberian Peninsula.

The previously announced JV partnership marks Greystar’s first investment in Spain and will serve as a platform to build a diversified rental housing business and portfolio with backing from global institutional capital.

“The Resa portfolio is undoubtedly Spain’s premier student accommodation provider and will provide Greystar with a significant presence in the prime markets of Madrid and Barcelona on which to build out a diversified Spanish rental housing platform,” said Wes Fuller, Executive Managing Director of Greystar’s Investment Management business. “We are excited by the tremendous opportunity in the country, and look forward to bringing Greystar’s proven business model and institutional capital to the Spanish market for the long term.”

Resa is Spain’s market leader in student accommodation managing 9,309 student beds in 19 Spanish cities, including tier one cities Madrid and Barcelona, in addition to Andalucía, Cataluña, Galicia, Navarra, Pais Vasco, Salamanca and Valencia. Resa, managed by Azora since 2011, has experienced significant growth during this period, increasing from 26 to 37 residences, of which four are currently under development. The JV portfolio will continue to trade under the Resa brand with Greystar assuming responsibility for overall management. Resa will operate as a fully Greystar-owned and managed business.

In addition to the Resa acquisition, Greystar together with its strategic long-term partners plans to invest further in the Spanish rental housing market, including additional student, young professional and senior housing for rent. Greystar is currently evaluating a pipeline of opportunities across Spain and Portugal including Madrid, Barcelona, Lisbon and other key Iberian cities.

“We are thrilled to add this high-quality well-established portfolio to Greystar’s growing European platform. As a global provider of rental housing, we are constantly looking for opportunities to expand into attractive new markets, and this acquisition does exactly that,” said Steven Zeeman, Greystar’s Managing Director of Continental Europe. “Spain is one of Europe’s fastest-growing economies with a serious shortage of purpose-built rental accommodation suitable for students and young professionals. Home ownership in the country has fallen in recent years, particularly with the country’s young and highly mobile urban population wanting a flexible alternative.

Despite this healthy appetite for new rental housing, construction has failed to keep pace with demand. The rental housing sector remains highly fragmented, with no established market for the type of purpose-built rental accommodation known as multifamily in the United States. Our investment strategy will allow us to develop a significant multifamily pipeline in Spain and grow our platform to realize the potential we see in the country.” (…).

About Greystar

Greystar is a leading, fully integrated multifamily real estate company offering expertise in investment management, development and property management of rental housing properties globally. Headquartered in Charleston, South Carolina with offices throughout the United States, Europe, Latin America and Asia-Pacific, Greystar is the largest operator of apartments in the United States, managing over 420,000 units in over 130 markets globally, with an aggregate estimated value of approximately $80 billion. Greystar also has a robust institutional investment management platform dedicated to managing capital on behalf of a global network of institutional investors with over $23 billion in gross assets under management, including more than $8 billion of developments that have been completed or are underway. Greystar was founded by Bob Faith in 1993 with the intent to become a world-class class service in the rental housing real estate business.

Original story: PE Hub (by Iris Dorbian)

Translation: Carmel Drake

PwC: High-Quality Asset Shortage Boosts RE Development

29 January 2016 – Cinco Días

The abundance of capital and shortage of high-quality assets will drive real estate development in 2016, as well as boost investment in alternative sectors. Those are the findings of a report, Trends in the European Real Estate Market in 2016, prepared by PwC on the basis of 550 interviews with key players in the sector.

Capital will continue to force its way into the market, thanks to the sustained environment of low interest rates in Europe – and the consequent greater appeal of real estate investments versus the low returns on fixed income products and the volatility of the markets – the majority of the cash flows from outside Europe will come from Asia and America.

Nevertheless, there will continue to be a scarcity of high-quality assets, and those that are available will be overvalued, in almost every European market. In this context, property development is the best option for acquiring high-quality assets with good prospects in terms of returns.

The property development drive will be accompanied by an increase in activity in other segments – beyond the traditional commercial and office properties – such as health centres, hotels, student accommodation, data centres and logistics assets.

The document reflects the optimism of the funds, institutional investors, real estate companies and banks, although to a lesser extent than last year. Expectations are especially high in countries in Southern Europe, including Spain. Financing has completely disappeared from the list of (these players’) concerns about the sector.

Just like every year, the report analyses the main European cities and classifies them on the basis of their investment and development prospects. Madrid and Barcelona fair well. The Spanish capital maintains its position as the fourth most attractive city in Europe, behind Berlin, Hamburg and Dublin. Between October 2014 and September 2015, Madrid was the fifth most active market in Europe, during which time €5,000 million was invested in the city. Barcelona rises one place in the ranking – from thirteenth to twelfth.

Original story: Cinco Días (by Carlos Santana)

Translation: Carmel Drake

The Student Hotel Buys Two Halls Of Residence In Barcelona

10 April 2015 – JLL Press Release

This is the first transaction involving the sale of student halls as investment properties in Barcelona.

The real estate consultancy firm JLL has advised The Student Hotel (TSH) on its purchase of two halls of residence in the city of Barcelona. The company already owns similar assets in Holland. Until now, the buildings were owned by a company, in which BBVA holds a stake.

The two properties are leased under a long-term contract to the student residence operator Melon District: Melon District Marina and Melon District Poble-sec – both are characterised by their excellent locations and good transport links to the main universities.

Marina is located on Calle Sacho de Ávila, in the 22@ neighbourhood of the city, a business district that is (currently) undergoing a complete regeneration. It is the location of choice for communications and technology companies, university campuses, as well as shopping centres, hotels and exhibitions centres. Meanwhile, Poble-sec is located on Avenida Paralel, in the Sants-Montjuic neighbourhood, which is mainly a residential area, but which is very well connected to the city centre and the university areas, and is surrounded by theatres and restaurants.

The two properties contain 600 rooms in total, covering an above-ground surface area of 16,700m2, as well as shops, with a surface area of 3,140m2, and 150 parking spaces.

“The sales process has received a lot of interest from both domestic and overseas investors, which clearly shows that the Spanish real estate market is one of the favourite destinations for capital at the moment”, explains Jordi Toboso, CEO of JLL in Cataluña. He also says that this transaction “shows the growing interest amongst investors for other types of assets, such as halls of residence in Spain, and in particular in Barcelona”.

 Original story: JLL Press Release

Translation: Carmel Drake

Student Halls In Spain: A Wise Alternative Investment?

17 February 2015 – Idealista

When we talk about real estate investment in Spain, we tend to mean the purchase of offices, hotels and shopping centres. Nevertheless, there is another type of property that may also generate high returns: student halls of residences. However, unlike in other European countries, this accommodation does not totally convince investors looking for assets in Spain. The lack of companies that know how to optimise them, and the shortage of the ideal product are some of the reasons why no transactions are being closed in this segment, despite considerable interest.

Spain had around 1.41 million students enrolled in universities during the academic year 2013-2014, according to the Ministry for Education, Culture and Sport. That is, a little over 3% of the Spanish population were university students. This percentage places Spain ahead of other countries such as Germany and France. The majority of these students (77%) studied courses in their home province, but 20% moved to another province to study and around 3% were from overseas.

Delving more deeply into their lifestyle: approximately 64% of university students live at home with their parents or other family members. At the other extreme, those who live away from home only have two options: rent (either in a shared house or on their own) or live in halls of residence. Specifically, only 2.8% choose to stay there.

In the opinion of the experts consulted, these figures are justified by the “very low” availability of public university halls. “Although there are significant cultural differences, certain aspects indicate that the market for university halls of residence in Spain will have to converge with that of the rest of Europe”, says a report published by JLL.

The consultancy firm is convinced by its analysis that the implementation of the Bologna education reforms will promote cross-border studying between European universities, “which tend to have much high percentages of students living in halls”. In Spain, it is normal for students to opt for this type of accommodation during the first and second years only.

“The flow of students travelling to study in other countries will increase over the coming years and not only in relation to Erasmus placements”, says Patricio Palomar, Director of Office Advisory and Alternative Investment at CBRE. In his opinion, issues such as the language (Spanish), the lifestyle and the affordable prices in comparison with neighbouring countries, are just a few of the attractions that draw many foreign students to choose Spain as their destination.

The main drawbacks

Unnim, the entity created from the merger of Cajas de Manlleu, Sabadell and Terrassa, is active in this market. The bank, which was acquired by BBVA in 2011, inherited this line of business from Caixa Terrassa. The former caja constructed its first hall of residence on the Avenida Parallel, 101, in the Poble Sec neighbourhood of Barcelona back in 2007.

According to the latest data available for Unnim, this business line generated a return of 7%. Sources in the sector explain that the net return on these types of assets can reach 10%, well above the rates offered by offices, hotels and shopping centres. In countries such as the UK and USA, this business generates returns of between 11% and 15%.

Juan Manuel Ortega, Director of Investment Offices at JLL, recognises that British firms are over-valuing these types of assets in Spain. These investors are looking for halls of residences that are larger than 5,000 m2 and that have between 60 and 150 rooms. Palomar also acknowledges this trend “the same funds that operate in the UK for example are looking (for opportunities) in Spain. The problem is that the same product is not available in other countries”.

Palomar maintains that student halls in Spain are obsolete and that many of them are stuck in the 1960s. That does not happen in cities such as Amsterdam where student accommodation is modern, hotel-like and less than 10 years old.

Another one of the pitfalls that affects this business is the ownership of these spaces. Most belong to the public universities, many of which have serious financial problems and cannot afford to finance the investment needed to optimise the assets. At the same time, they cannot sell the land and allow private companies to enter the sector.

This has a very direct effect on competition; it is low, which does not lead to an improvement in the facilities either. Similarly, experts recognise that the administration of these complexes is not simple, they require professional management.

Nevertheless, Palomar states that new student halls of residence are appearing in the outskirts of cities and near private business schools. “I think Spain should focus on other kinds of tourism, beyond the holiday market; educational and health tourism (have significant potential)”.

A trickle of transactions

The lethargy in this market is such that transactions are very scarce. The last known deal involved the purchase of the Galdós halls of residence in Madrid in 2012. The British firm, Knightsbridge Student Housing paid €20 million for the property, it was the first acquisition made by the company outside of the UK. Knightsbridge Student Housing was created in 2010 with the backing of Oaktree Capital Management.

Another of the most talked about transactions involved Lazora (Concha Osácar) when it acquired the Resa Group in 2011. Resa was created in 1994 and currently manages more than 8,000 beds in 32 halls of residence. The construction company Acciona also has give halls of residence (in Albacete, Cádiz, Castellón, Lleida and Murcia), which it has tried to sell in the past.

Further proof that this branch of real estate activity in Spain is still light years away from what is happening in other countries, is that Socimis dedicated to student accommodation already exist overseas. In 2013, GCP Student Living constituted the first REIT (Real Estate Investment Trust) in the UK.

Original story: Idealista (by Estefania Fonseca)