Grupo Ortiz Puts its Socimi up for Sale with Assets Worth €150M

27 November 2017 – El Independiente

The Carpintero family, the majority shareholder of the Socimi Grupo Ortiz Properties, has put the company up for sale, just four months after it started trading on the Alternative Investment Market (MAB). The sales prospectus has been in the offices of potential interested parties for several days now, according to intel gathered by El Independiente.

The company, which has real estate assets worth more than €150 million and a capitalisation of €74 million, owns 100,000 m2 of space for rent, with a 96% occupancy rate.

Most of the assets, equivalent to 97% of their value, are located in Madrid, and they generate aggregate net rental income of €6.9 million. The residual part of the portfolio is located in Asturias and Guadalajara.

The intention of the Carpintero family is to continue as a shareholder of the company, by holding onto around 30% of the share capital.

The company is led by Juan Antonio Carpintero (pictured above), President of Grupo Ortiz and Chairman of the Socimi’s Board of Directors, alongside his children María and Carlos Carpintero, Raúl Arce as the CEO of the construction company and Carlos Cuervo-Arango Martínez, a former director of Zeltia.

According to the company’s own reports, the market value of the assets owned by Grupo Ortiz Properties amounts to €150 million. Of those, its office buildings account for €67.1 million; its homes and apartments another €70.7 million; its warehouses €3.6 million; and its other premises and parking spaces €8.7 million.

In the documentation prepared for its debut on the stock market, Grupo Ortiz Properties described the nature of the property sector at the moment. “The real estate market is entering an attractive point in the cycle in light of the improvement being seen in the main macroeconomic indicators, such as consumer confidence, employment, interest rates, exports/imports, the industrial production index, the reactivation of the second-hand residential market – they are all signs of the economic recovery and of the start of a change in the cycle”.

The Socimi highlights that its “management strategy is based on long-term leases to solvent tenants (both economically and professionally) in order to ensure long-term sustainability and the ability to obtain an attractive return in exchange for the risk assumed”.

Original story: El Independiente (by Ana Antón)

Translation: Carmel Drake

The Housing Market Recovery Will Strengthen In 2017

9 January 2017 – Expansión

Expansión interviews a panel of real estate experts / Analysts expect house prices to rise by around 5% on average in 2017, but that figure is likely to be even higher in the large cities. Moreover, sales will grow at a higher rate than prices, even though the comparison will be performed against 2016, when around 400,000 transaction were completed. (…).

The property sector started to reverse its negative trend in 2014; it really emerged from the darkness in 2015; and the improvement started to be felt across the country in 2016, albeit in the shadow of the political paralysis. For this reason, and with the macroeconomic improvement to boot, 2017 is set to be the year in which the real estate recovery finally takes hold. The consensus of the experts consulted by Expansión is that house prices will rise moderately, by around 5% during 2017; sales will increase by even more – around 10%; and mortgage lending will flow a lot better than last year. All of this provided that interest rates do not rise.

The reasons for this realistic optimism are primarily macroeconomic. The increase in employment (above all), the growth in GDP, the improvement in consumer confidence – a more important indicator for the real estate sector than many people think – and the gradual opening of the mortgage tap are juxtaposed in a virtuous way for property, which will not only become attractive again for those looking to reposition themselves on the property ladder, but which has also become a major focus of returns for investors. At the same time, there is still some uncertainty hanging over this recovery. For example, the scarcity in terms of the demand for new households.

In this context of a “slow, moderate but constant recovery”, as defined by Beatriz Toribio, Head of Research at Fotocasa, house prices will definitely rise, but not very significantly, according to all of the experts that have responded to our survey.

For example, Aguirre Newman estimates “price growth of around 6% for new and second-hand homes”, according to Juan Riestra, Director of the Residential Division at the real estate consultancy. Maurice Kelly, Director of the Residential area at JLL, thinks that established areas, such as the centres of major cities and exclusive locations along the coast will see “increases of more than 6%”.

Almost all of the forecasts indicate price rises of around 5% and highlight the disparity between the different real estate markets around the country. (…).

José Luis Ruiz Bartolomé, Managing Partner at the consultancy Chamberí AM, notes that “prices will rise by around 5%…” but adds a new and different perspective: “These price rises will not be driven by the central districts of Madrid and Barcelona (like until now), but rather by the more peripheral regions and other cities that have not been performing particularly well so far”.

Moreover, not all of the analysts agree with the forecast of 5%. Jorge Ripoll, Director of Research at Tinsa, thinks that the increase will be less marked, ranging between 0.1% and 2%. (…).

Original story: Expansión (by Juanma Lamet)

Translation: Carmel Drake