Fotocasa: Second-Hand House Prices Rose by 8.4% YoY in March

10 April 2019 – El Confidencial

According to data from the real estate portal Fotocasa, second-hand house prices rose by 8.4% in the year to March 2019, the largest increase since 2007. The average price of a second-hand home now amounts to €1,900/m2, a figure not seen since November 2012.

The data shows that YoY prices recorded 30 months of consecutive increases in March, although a rise of more than 5% has not been seen for 16 months.

The price rises were led by 3 autonomous regions, in particular, which experienced double-digit rises, namely: Madrid (19%), the Balearic Islands (12.5%) and the Canary Islands (11.8%), but prices rose in 16 of the 17 regions. Asturias was the only region to experience a price decrease, of -0.03%.

On average, house prices are still 35.6% below their peak, which was recorded in April 2007 (€2,952/m2).

In terms of average prices, Madrid (€2,976/m2), País Vasco (€2,810/m2) and the Balearic Islands (€2,617/m2) were the most expensive autonomous regions to buy a second-hand home in March. By contrast, Extremadura was the cheapest region (€1,108/m2), followed by Castilla-La Mancha (€1,141/m2), Murcia (€1,164/m2) and La Rioja (€1,402/m2).

By province, 43 of the 50 provinces recorded positive quarterly price variations and seven registered inter-annual price variations of more than 10%, specifically: Madrid (19%), Alicante (15.6%), the Balearic Islands (12.5%), Málaga (12.4%), Las Palmas (12.1%), Santa Cruz de Tenerife (11.4%) and Guadalajara (10.9%).

In Madrid Capital, 18 of the 21 districts saw price increases in March, led by Carabanchel (4%), Vicálvaro and Barajas (both 3.5%). Meanwhile, prices decreased in Chamartín (-3.3%), Latina and Usera (both -0.4%).

Meanwhile, in Barcelona, second-hand house prices rose in 5 of the 10 districts in March, led by Sants – Montjuïc (1.9%), Sarrià – Sant Gervasi (1.4%) and Gràcia (1.2%). The largest QoQ price decrease was recorded in Sant Martí (-1.1%).

Original story: El Confidencial (by E.S.)

Translation/Summary: Carmel Drake

Forcadell: New Home Sales Rose by 28% in Barcelona in H2 2017

21 February 2018 – Eje Prime

Barcelona is growing with new homes, even though they are more expensive than they were five years ago. The Catalan capital is experiencing significant growth in the sale of new homes from its residential stock, despite the socio-political situation that has been rumbling along for several months. During the second half of 2017, the sector saw the number of new house sales grow by 28% in the province of Barcelona compared to the same period in 2016, according to a report from the real estate consultancy Forcadell.

In addition to transactions, the price of new homes and the number of developments also increased, although the consultancy indicates that the current supply of homes in this segment is still scarce in the city of Barcelona, due to the lack of space. The only land reserves left are located in the 22@ district and in Poblenou, “which makes an increase in building renovation activity very necessary in the Catalan capital. Currently, such activity only accounts for 3.5% of new residential developments”, according to Forcadell.

During the second half of the year, the report highlights the activity recorded in the months of July and November, with significant peaks in the number of new home sales: 717 and 607, respectively, according to data from the National Institute of Statistics (INE). In this sense, and given the lack of land in the Catalan capital, the Barcelona market is expanding towards its neighbouring municipalities, such as el Barcelonès, el Baix Llobregat and el Vallès Occidental.

Within the city of Barcelona, the district that had the largest supply of new build homes between June and December was Sarrià-Sant Gervasi, whilst Ciutat Vella and l’Eixample put the most renovated assets on the market. Prices in the capital grew by 2.7% in half-yearly terms, with an overall average price of €5,439/m2. In this area, Sant Andreu was the neighbourhood with the highest increase in prices; and for this year and next, Nou Barris is set to see the highest increases in the price of new homes, according to Forcadell. The overall trend for this year is also expected to be bullish.

Forecasts from the consultancy firm indicate that construction activity in Barcelona will continue to increase over the coming months, above all in the towns adjacent to the city. Nevertheless, the lack of buildable land and the delay in the granting of licences may water down the good times that the property development sector will enjoy from 2019 onwards.

Rental market – mismatch between supply and demand

The rental market, which has been so in vogue recently, suffered from an important mismatch between supply and demand for rental homes costing between €850 and €1,000. This situation has resulted from an increase in the interest from clients in the metropolitan area.

In terms of demand, Forcadell indicates that during the second half of the year (…) rental prices continued to rise.

In this way, the report from the consultancy firm places the average price of a rental home at €15.50/m2/month, up by 1.9% with respect to the same period in 2016. Ciutat Vella is the district that registered the highest rents in the Catalan capital, of €19/m2/month, but Forcadell estimates that the trend will stabilise in the city in 2018 (…).

Moreover, the sale of second-hand homes recorded a YoY increase of 5.1%, with 31,485 operations. According to Forcadell, l’Eixample was the district with the largest supply of homes in the second half of the year, followed by Sant Martí, Ciutat Vella and Sarrià-Sant Gervasi.

The sales prices of second-hand homes increased by 1.7% between the first and second halves of 2017, to record an increase of 6.8% with respect to the end of 2016. The average price paid for a home measuring 90 m2, with three or four bedrooms, in Barcelona was €2,952/m2.

Original story: Eje Prime 

Translation: Carmel Drake

Rental Prices Rose by 9.48% In Barcelona in 2017

15 February 2018 – Eje Prime

Rental prices are continuing to rise in Barcelona. The average price of the new contracts signed in 2017 amounted to €877.20, up by 9.48% compared to a year earlier. In this way, the Catalan capital has now recorded four consecutive years of price increases.

Last year, 49,953 new residential rental contracts were formalised in Barcelona, almost 8,000 more than in 2016, according to data published today by the Chamber of Urban Property in Barcelona.

The neighbourhood of Eixample accounted for the highest market share, with 21%, followed by Sant Martí, with 12%, Ciutat Vella, with 11%, and Sants-Monjuïc, Sarrià-Sant Gervasi and Gràcia, with 10% each.

This data contrasts with the forecasts made by the Chamber at the end of last year, which predicted a containment of prices in the city. The districts that saw the highest price rises were Sants-Montjuïc (12.43%) and Ciutat Vella (12.11%), followed by Nou Barris (11.48%) and Horta-Guinardó (10.38%). The lowest price rises were seen in Les Corts (6.73%) and Sarrià Sant-Gervasi (7.27%).

Original story: Eje Prime 

Translation: Carmel Drake

Rental Boom Triggers Investment in Madrid & Barcelona

27 January 2018 – Expansión

Markets are booming / The central parts of Spain’s two largest cities are the most sought-after by those investing in housing in search of returns, but rental prices are increasing more quickly in the districts on the outskirts of those cities, with rises of more than 10%. The experts forecast an accentuation of this trend, given that the supply of rental properties in the prime districts is starting to prove insufficient to cover all of the demand.

The real estate recovery is happening at three speeds. On the one hand, the large cities and most established areas along the coast are experiencing significant house price rises, a notable increase in sales, an increase in rental prices, a rise in non-residential investment and even a shortage of land for sale. On the other hand, medium-sized cities have left the lethargy behind and are now recovering, although with less energy than the large real estate centres. Finally, the less populated provinces are still recording ups and downs, although even there it is clear that the worst of the crisis is now over.

A large part of this improvement is due to the country’s underlying macroeconomic performance, but not all of it. The impact of private investors is playing a crucial role in the strengthening of the two large real estate centres, whose prime areas are the most sought-after by those looking to buy homes to put them up for rent, where they can obtain returns of more than 10%. Why? Because, in addition to the immediate increase in value that they are obtaining, a kind of rental boom is also happening in Madrid and Barcelona.

That said, “rental prices may be starting to peak in cities such as Barcelona and Madrid” says Beatriz Toribio, Head of Research at Fotocasa. “The market is normalising”, and so “although rental prices will continue to rise during 2018, they will do so at a lower rate than they did in 2017”, she adds.

The district of Chamberí exceeded the district of Salamanca in 2017 as the most expensive in the capital for renting a home. The average price of a rental home in Chamberí is €16.41/m2/month, followed by Salamanca (€16.07/m2/month), Tetuán (€14.94), Chamartín (€14.46) and Retiro (€14.35). At the other end of the spectrum, the district of Villaverde, with an average rental home cost of €8.91/m2/month was the most affordable. It was followed by Vicálvaro (€9.58), Moratalaz (€9.68), Villa de Vallecas (€9.90) and Usera (€10.15).

Almost all of the districts in the capital saw rental prices increase with respect to 12 months earlier. The district that rose by the most was Hortaleza, which increased by 13.1%, followed by Puente de Vallecas (12.9%), Ciudad Lineal (11%), Usera (9.4%), Retiro (9.1%) and Tetuán (9%) (….).

In Barcelona, the same thing is happening. The two districts that closed 2017 with decreases in rental prices are two classics in the rental market: Eixample (-1.4%) and Ciutat Vella (-1.2%). How come? “The rental boom started in the best locations and so when those areas reach very high prices, demand starts to withdraw from these areas and move to other more peripheral neighbourhoods”, says the real estate consultant José Luis Ruiz Bartolomé, Managing Partner at Chamberí AM. “The push from investors is also moving to other less central neighbourhoods, which are very well connected and cheap compared to the city centre”, he adds (…).

Specifically, the district of Ciutat Vella is the most expensive in all of Spain when it comes to renting a home. The average price there amounted to €17.16/m2/month in December 2017, despite the decrease seen YoY. It was followed by the second most expensive district, Sarrià-Sant Gervasi, whose average price amounted to €16.63/m2/month in December (…). Compared to 2016, prices rose in eight districts in the Catalan capital. The leader of that ranking was Sant Andreu, where prices rose by 12%, followed by Gràcia (9.5%), Les Corts (8.1%), Sants – Montjuïc (6.7%), Nou Barris (6.4%), Horta–Guinardó (4.8%), Sarrià-Sant Gervasi (3.9%) and Sant Martí (2.7%).

Gustavo Rossi, President of Alquiler Seguro, adds that “2017 will be remembered as the year in which the supply of rental housing became insufficient to meet demand”. The sector needs to be professionalised and the owners of empty properties need to realise that putting them on the market is a good option”, he says.

“Over the last decade, rental has established itself as the preferred option for young people and new families. In 2018, we are going to move closer than ever to the European model, where the rental segment has many followers”. (…).

Original story: Expansión (by Juanma Lamet)

Translation: Carmel Drake

Tinsa: House Prices Fell by 1.7% in Barcelona & Rose by 4.5% in Madrid in Q4

30 December 2017 – Expansión

The real estate market is continuing on the path to recovery, but it has encountered an unexpected obstacle: “the process” (‘el procés’ in Catalan). In fact, the instability generated by the independentist challenge in Cataluña caused a slow down in the rate of growth that had been seen in both Cataluña and Barcelona until September, when the Catalan capital was leading the reactivation of the sector.

The path that Madrid and Barcelona had been following together diverged in the last quarter of 2017 when house prices in Barcelona decreased by 1.7% compared to the previous quarter, whilst in the Spanish capital, they rose by 4.5%, according to the Local Markets Index compiled by the appraisal company Tinsa. That figure represents the first decrease in the Catalan capital since Q2 2016.

“The political situation had a negative impact on house prices in Barcelona during the final quarter (of 2017)”, explained Jorge Ripoll, Director of Research at Tinsa. According to his explanations, “we are seeing a build-up of demand, primarily amongst investors, which has now started to spread to other buyer profiles”.

The quarterly decrease in Barcelona was concentrated in some of the districts that have some of the highest prices, such as Ciutat Vella (which saw a decrease of 5.8%), Les Corts (-5.5%) and Sarrià-Sant Gervasi (-1.1%); and they were not offset by the increases recorded in other neighbourhoods, such as Nou Barris (4.6%) and Sants-Montjüic (4.2%). Meanwhile, the growth in Madrid was boosted by significant increases in the districts of Chamartín (8.4%), La Latina (7.9%) and Carabanchel (6.9%).

This data means that Madrid outperformed Barcelona in terms of cumulative growth over the course of the year. In this way, the Spanish capital went from a YoY increase of 15.5% in Q3 to 17.1% in Q4, the highest of any of the provincial capitals. By contrast, the YoY increase in Barcelona moderated from 20.6% in Q3 to 14.8% in Q4, making it the second-placed municipality. In the Spanish capital, the most significant YoY increases were recorded in the following districts: Centro (21.1%), Salamanca and Retiro (both 17.6%); whilst in the Catalan city, prices soared in Sants-Montjüic (26.5%) and Sant Martí (24%).

The pull of the country’s two largest cities meant that house prices in Spain rose by 4.2% last year, accelerating significantly with respect to the 0.6% recorded in 2016 to reach an average price of €1,264/m2. This represents “moderate growth” according to Ripoll, who highlights that 2017 marked “the start of the recovery”.

Besides Madrid and Barcelona, the cities that recorded the highest price rises were Palma de Mallorca (13.7%), Pamplona (12.5%), Burgos (8.8%) and Vitoria (8.2%). In total, 30 of the 49 provincial capitals analysed in the study recorded positive growth. They also included important urban nuclei such as San Sebastián (6.1%), Sevilla (5.9%), Alicante (5.7%), Málaga (4.5%) and Valencia (3.9%). Of the 19 provincial capitals that recorded negative figures, the most notable decreases were recorded in Bilbao (-3.5%), Vigo (-0.6%) and Zaragoza (-0.8%), although Ciudad Real (-12.6%) recorded the worst result.

The decrease in house prices in Barcelona during the fourth quarter means that the Catalan capital was knocked off of its podium by San Sebastián as the most expensive town in Spain per square metre. In this way, the average house price in the Donostiarra city amounts to €3,231/m2. Meanwhile, the average house price in Barcelona amounts to €3,129/m2, and so, the sizeable gap – of approximately 20% – was maintained with respect to Madrid, where appraisers estimate that the average house price amounts to €2,601/m2 (…).

In terms of the effects that the Catalan crisis may have on the performance of the sector over the medium-term, Ripoll highlights that if the uncertainty experienced over the last quarter is prolonged, the negative evolution in Barcelona “may become endemic and result in a contraction”. Moreover, “we cannot rule out that” that phenomenon “will affect the rest of Spain” (…).

In this way, the average price of €1,264/m2 represents a return to the levels last seen in Q3 2013 and means that prices have decreased by 38.3% on average with respect to the historical maximum reached in 2007 (…).

Original story: Expansión (by Ignacio Bolea)

Translation: Carmel Drake

Tinsa: House Prices Rise By Most In Madrid & Barcelona

18 July 2016 – Expansión

The Balearic and Canary Islands are featuring in the housing recovery, but Madrid and Barcelona are leading the way; there, the number of transactions has picked up pace and prices are growing strongly once again. Most of these increases are due to the economic recovery, but the savings factor is also playing a major part.

In fact, the influence of private investors is still playing a crucial role in the strengthening of the two major real estate regions, whose central districts are the most sought-after by companies and individuals, both Spanish and foreign.

It is precisely the influence of these investors that boosted property prices in both capitals in the first place, firing the starting gun for the reactivation of the sector, as they committed to the prime areas before anyone else. These central districts, which are well-connected and offer good services, used to offer a certain degree of security for investors, and a great deal of potential for appreciation, even when everyone in the market was still searching for land.

Both cities were amongst the leaders of the increase in house prices during the second quarter of the year, according to data from the appraisal company Tinsa, published recently. Nevertheless, these increases were concentrated in some of the most expensive areas, as shown by the analysis by district of the local markets. Specifically, many of the neighbourhoods where prices stand at around €3,000/sqm in Madrid and Barcelona are also those where prices have risen by the most in the last year, whereas prices in those neighbourhoods that fall below the average have grown more moderately.

For example, prices in the Madrilenian neighbourhood of Salamanca have risen by 9.8% in the last year, whilst in Chamberí they have increased by 8.9%. Meanwhile, in Barcelona, the following districts stand out: Gràcia (where prices have risen by 12.7%), El Eixample (10.9%) and Les Corts (8.1%). These statistics show that the prime areas are recovering better than the rest. They are central, well-connected areas with very solvent demand, where returns are high and there is significant retail activity, which means they have significant potential for appreciation both for those buying to invest as well as those looking to put their properties up for rent. As with everything, there are notable exceptions, such as the Retiro area in Madrid and Sarrià-Sant Gervasi in Barcelona, which are increasing by below the average.

Other areas

Nevertheless, the real estate expert José Luis Ruiz Bartolomé indicates that the real estate market has now entered a new phase, in which the recovery is spreading to more and more areas. “Before, properties were only being sold in the best districts, but now the increases have spread to the most popular areas, as supply is limited and there are increasingly more buyers looking for homes to live in, rather than to buy as investments”, he explains.

For this reason, the most popular neighbourhoods have become more attractive with the recovery of the labour market and the opening of the bank financing tap. In this way, house prices in the Madrilenian neighbourhood of San Blas have risen by 9.9%, making it the second highest price rise district in the capital; meanwhile, Sant Andreu is also boosting prices in Cataluña, with an increase of 8.2%. Similarly, prices in all of the districts of Madrid that cost less than €2,000/sqm have increased by more than the average, with the exception of Villaverde, the cheapest of all, where prices have remained stable. Something similar is happening in Barcelona where the most popular areas, such as Nou Barris and Sants-Montjuïc, also grew by more than average. (…).

Moreover, Tasaciones CBRE indicates that the profile of investments funds “has evolved rapidly from being opportunistic to value-added, choosing instead to back development, the renovation of properties and, given that they have perceived the potential for refurbishments, they will gradually start managing plots of land in urban areas, with the aim of obtaining higher returns”. With this, the increase in demand and prices will increasingly move to more remote areas. (…).

Original story: Expansión (by Pablo Cerezal)

Translation: Carmel Drake

ST: New House Prices Rise By 4% In MAD & BCN

30 June 2016 – El País

According to ST Sociedad de Tasación, the average price of new homes grew by 4% YoY in June in the cities of Madrid and Barcelona. They were the two provincial capitals with the highest new home price rises in the last year. These price increases, which are not being seen in other capital, have been driven by the shortage of new home stock, explain sources at ST. “Our analysis of this data and of the increasing trend observed since June 2015 allows us to predict that Barcelona and Madrid are going to act as the drivers of the recovery process for new house prices, albeit at a slow pace”.

Barcelona is the provincial capital that recorded the highest new house prices, with an average of €3,390/sqm. Prices grew there by 2.2% during the first half of 2016. The YoY price increase in Barcelona was 4.1%, the highest of all of Spain’s provincial capitals.

By district, Gracia recorded the highest increase in new house prices, with a rise of 7.72%. It was followed by the neighbourhoods of Sarria-Sant Gervasi, with 6.94% and Sant Marti, with 6.38%. At the other end of the spectrum, the districts with the lowest YoY price increases were Ciutat Vella (1.33%), Sant Andreu (1.93%) and Nou Barris (2.33%).

And not only did the district of Sarria-Sant Gervasi in Barcelona record one of the highest price rises, it also registered the highest average price per constructed square metre, at €5,672/sqm. The districts of Les Corts and L’Eixample were ranked in second and third place, respectively, in terms of average prices, with values of €4,610/sqm and €4,511/sqm. By contrast, the districts with the lowest average prices were Nou Barris (€2,721/sqm), Sants-Montjuic (€3,024/sqm) and Sant Andreu (€3,062/sqm).

In Madrid, a new home costs €2,886/sqm on average

In the case of Madrid, new house prices have grown by 4% with respect to the previous year and by 2.1% during the first half of 2016. That takes the average price of new homes in Madrid to €2,886/sqm.

The ranking for the YoY variation in new house prices is headed by Ciudad Lineal, which saw growth of 5.8%. It was followed by Barajas, with 5.7% and Arganzuela, with 5.4%. At the other end of the spectrum, the neighbourhoods with the lowest YoY price variations were Hortaleza (0.8%) and La Latina (1%), followed by Tetuán (1.8%).

In terms of the average price of new homes, Salamanca was once again the most expensive district in the capital, with an average price of €4,799/sqm, followed by Chamberí (€4,626/sqm) and the Centre (€3,939/sqm). By contrast, the neighbourhoods of Vicálvaro, Villaverde and Villa de Vallecas registered the lowest average new home prices, of €1,856/sqm, €1,883/sqm and €2,203/sqm, respectively.

Original story: El País (by S.L.L.)

Translation: Carmel Drake

House Prices Rise By 10%+ In Most Exclusive Neighbourhoods

5 April 2016 – Expansión

Changing trend / Madrid and Barcelona are leading the recovery in the residential market, with house price increases of 9.2% and 7.5%, respectively during Q1 2016. The appraisal value of homes is now on the rise in every district of both cities.

(…). According to statistics from the appraisal company Tinsa, the value of residential properties increased by 1.4% during the first three months of 2016, with Barcelona and Madrid leading the charge.

The average appraisal value of (unsubsidised) homes per m2 in Barcelona amounts to €2,551/m2, which is 19% more expensive than the average in Madrid (€2,142/m2). This gap between the two cities has a simple explanation: not only have house prices been rising significantly faster in Barcelona than in Madrid, but also the Catalan capital has a higher population density than Madrid, which affects supply and demand, resulting in a higher degree of concentration. Moreover, barely any new residential properties are being constructed in Barcelona. (…).

The evolution of house prices in Madrid and Barcelona varies by neighbourhood. House prices rose in all 10 districts of the Catalan capital during Q1 2016, without exception and, for the first time, they also increased in all 21 Madrilenian districts. That has not happened since the real estate bubble burst.

The ranking

The highest price increases were concentrated in Barcelona. The two districts where average prices rose by the most were Les Corts (13.5%) and Sants-Montjuïc (12.2%). They were followed by the district of Salamanca, Madrid’s main real estate district, with an increase of 11.8%.

With an average price of €3,597/m2 and despite the heterogeneity of the neighbourhoods that comprise it, Salamanca is the district with the second highest prices of all of those analysed by Tinsa, behind only Sarrà-Sant Gervasi, which has an average price of €3,671/m2 (5.8% higher than in 2014). (…)

According to calculations from the consultancy firm Knight Frank, prices are going to rise by between 5% and 10% in prime areas in 2016, especially in five areas of the Madrilenian capital, namely Salamanca, Jerónimos, Chamberí, Justicia and El Viso. (…).

In Madrid, the most expensive districts after Salamanca are Chamberí (€3,444/m2 for subsidised homes, up by 5.4% compared with Q1 2015), Retiro (€3,270/m2, up by 4.3%), Chamartín (€3,312/m2, up by 1.7%) and the Centro, which has exceeded the €3,000/m2 threshold once again (€3,014/m2, up by 3.7%). All of the others sit below this psychological barrier, such as for example Moncloa-Aravaca (€2,793/m2 and 6.9%) and Arganzuela (€2,697/m2 and 8.5%).

The cheapest areas

The cheapest areas in Madrid are Villaverde (€1,232/m2), followed by Puente de Vallecas (€1,307/m2), Usera (€1,398/m2) and Carabanchel (€1,531/m2).

Average house prices will increase significantly in the Madrilenian capital during 2016, according to predictions by real estate analysts.

In Barcelona, Nou Barris is the district where house prices are lowest (€1,752/m2), followed by Horta Guinardó (€2,007/m2) and Sant Andreu (€2,105/m2). They are the only three places in Barcelona where prices are lower than the average price in Madrid (€2,142/m2), however, as is always the case in a market as fragmented as the housing sector, each area has its own micro-market. (…).

In any case, the forecasts are promising, in general terms. “In terms of both the number of transactions and prices, there has been a certain rebound effect following the collapse of the market that had not been seen for many decades. Now we need to wait for the stabilisation of the market, for similar data to that seen last year”, says Jorge Ripoll, Director of Research Services at Tinsa.

For the upwards trend to be maintained, the growth forecasts must be met and the labour market must improve. The other factors are already working on autopilot, at least in Madrid and Barcelona.

Original story: Expansión (by Juanma Lamet)

Translation: Carmel Drake

Carmena Halts The Sale Of 2,000+ EMVS Homes

29 July 2015 – Cinco Días

Manuela Carmena, the mayoress of Madrid has announced that the Town Hall of Madrid will not sell any of the 2,086 rented homes, owned by the EMVS (Municipal Company for Land and Housing or ‘Empresa Municipal de la Vivienda y Suelo’), to vulture funds and that it will put a stop to 70 planned eviction processes. Her statement came after a meeting on Tuesday with the “Yo no me voy” platform, supported by more than 220 residents in five of the affected buildings in the ‘Centro’ neighbourhood of the city.

The beneficiaries of the social housing rental properties owned by the EMVS across the city started to receive notifications and visits in 2012, informing them that their contracts would not be renewed. Previously that was something that had happened automatically, every two years, provided two requirements were fulfilled, in accordance with Decree 100/86: the household income must not exceed a certain level and the tenants must not own any property in the Community of Madrid. In total, 2,086 contracts of this type are currently in place across the city’s 21 districts.

The EMVS started proceedings against tenants who refused to leave their rented homes. “To date, there are 70 processes underway, but these families have now recovered their homes. No-one is going to be kicked out on the street. The Town Hall of Madrid is going to withdraw all of those processes. For us, the right to housing, as recognised by the Constitution, is fundamental”, said Carmena. The EMVS’s commitment extends to 2,086 homes. (…).

Manuela Carmena said that the Town Hall is now “making contact” with residents who are currently “confused” because they think that their social housing contracts are going to be terminated and that their homes are going to be sold. We will explain to them that the contract “is valid and that they will not lose their homes”.

The councillor has not denied the “immense distress” that these tenants have gone through, after finding out that they had to leave the homes they had lived in for more than 20 years. (…).

Original story: Cinco Días

Translation: Carmel Drake

Idealista: Rental Prices Rose By 1.8% In Madrid In Q1

8 May 2015 – El Confidencial

The property crisis; the difficulties faced by thousands of citizens when it comes to buying a home; and the havoc wreaked by evictions have all resulted in a significant boost to the (residential) rental market in Spain. Over the last seven years, many citizens and families have been forced out of the property market and, given their need or desire to become independent or start a family, their only exit has been through the home rental market.

Thus, although owned homes still win by a landslide over rented homes – 78% to 22%, i.e. a very similar level to the one seen at the end of the 1980s – the fact is that in recent years, the balance has tipped a little less towards the property side and although, many experts consider that it is unlikely that we will reach the levels seen in other parts of Europe, where rental properties account for 50% of the residential market in some countries, it is clear that something is changing. “The rental market is here to stay and not just as a lifestyle option, but also as an investment”, says Fernando Encinar, Head of Research at idealista.com.

The rental market in the Community of Madrid is showing the first signs of recovery, as too is the sale and purchase market. Similarly, some areas are sparking greater interest than others in terms of demand, which, in turn, is starting to create a certain amount of tension in terms of prices.

The differences between neighbourhoods are clear. It does not cost the same to rent a flat in the centre of the capital or in the neighbourhoods of Chamberí and Salamanca, where the price per square metre is around €14/m2 (€1,120 for an 80m2 flat) as it does in Villaverde, Carabanchel or Puente de Vallecas, where the price per square metre barely exceeds 8€ (640€ for an 80m2 flat).

These price differences are explained, in part, by the location of the homes – clearly, it does not cost the same to live in the centre of the city as it does in the suburbs – but also due to the excess supply, in places such as Carabanchel and Vallecas, and the strong demand, in areas such as Sanchinarro and Las Tablas, where the experts detect a lot of activity due to the presence of Telefónica and the future arrival of BBVA.

(….)

The tension in terms of rental prices is palpable. Madrid ended the winter with a quarterly increase in rental prices of 1.8%, taking the average price per square metre in the capital to €11.60, however, that represents a cumulative decrease of 15.8% from its record high of €13.80/m2 in 2008.

Moreover, during the first three months of the year, the increase in rental prices was generalised, with rises in almost every district in Madrid, with the exception of Villa de Vallecas and the neighbourhood of Salamanca, according to the data from idealista.com, which also reflects significant increases in the districts of Barajas (5.8%), Retiro (4.7%) and Hortaleza (3.6%).

(….)

Original story: El Confidencial (by Elena Sanz)

Translation: Carmel Drake