Realia & Pryconsa Buy Two Plots Of Land From Ministry Of Defence

5 October 2017 – Expansión

The incessant drip feeding of operations in Madrid involving the purchase of land on which to build homes is continuing. In this case, the stars have been the real estate companies Realia, controlled by Carlos Slim, and Pryconsa, owned by the Colomer family. The plots were put up for sale by the Ministry of Defence in July for a combined sum of €40 million.

The first is a plot for residential use, located on the outskirts of Alcalá de Henares. Measuring 14,395 m2 and with a buildable surface area of 44,755 m2, the asking price amounted to €27 million, according to the real estate portal Addmeet. In the end, Realia paid €27.524 million for the plot.

The second plot sparked even more interest. Located in Vicálvaro and measuring 13,723m2, it has a buildable surface area of 19,000 m2. The Ministry of Defence put that plot up for sale for €12.6 million. In the end, the plot was awarded to Pryconsa for more than €15.12 million, almost 20% more than the original asking price.

Original story: Expansión (by R. Ruiz)

Translation: Carmel Drake

Valdebebas: Carmena Cuts 160 Homes & Insists On Social Housing

16 February 2017 – El Confidencial

Fewer homes and no unsubsidised properties. That is the condition that the Town Hall of Madrid has put on the table to unblock the “commercial pill” of Valdebebas, the last plot of land in the area that is still waiting to receive the necessary administrative and legal blessings before the cranes can move in.

On Tuesday, the Town Hall presented its buildable surface area and density proposals for the area, where 1,000 homes were going to be constructed on a plot that was initially going to house the largest shopping centre in Europe.

As expected, the Town Hall has reduced the buildable surface area, although by more than initially expected. Specifically, it has reduced the space allocated to residential use by 18,000 m2, an adjustment that affects almost all of the 14 plots (around 16,000 m2) that Pryconsa acquired from the Compensation Board last year.

The direct consequence of this change is that the company owned by the Colomer family is going to have to recalculate its figures and construct between 140 and 160 fewer homes. This represents a reduction of just over 15% compared to the number initially proposed, all of which were going to be social housing properties.

The other major loser under the Town Hall’s proposal is Premier, the owner of a plot of land allocated for unsubsidised housing, with a buildable surface area of almost 11,000 m2. The Town Hall has said that it must now build in accordance with some kind of protected housing scheme, as well as reduce its buildable surface area by 2,000 m2.

By contrast, the Joyfe College and the Valdecam Cooperative, which acquired land on which to construct 65 social housing properties, will not have to make any changes to their plans (…).

Next steps

After its meeting with the Town Hall on Tuesday, the Valdebebas Compensation Board, which represents almost 5,000 owners in the area, will present the Town Hall’s proposal to its governing board. That body, in which only large landowners participate, may opt to take a decision or may refer it to the assembly, so that all of the owners, and not just the large ones, take the decision.

The problem that the Compensation Board now faces is that it has to reduce the price at which it sold its plots to Pryconsa and Premier, given that the use and buildable surface area of those plots has been modified. This means that it will have fewer resources to allocate to all of the social service works – healthcare, education, sports facilities – that are required in the area. (…) This new proposal emerged after the ruling from the Superior Court of Justice of Madrid (TSJM) last year, which overturned the special plan for the area.

It is possible that the Compensation Board will reject the Town Hall’s plan and wait until the Supreme Court makes its ruling regarding the TSJ’s ruling. The problem is that, if it endorses the existing ruling, it will return to the initial situation, in other words, no homes will be built at all, given that the 109,000 m2 in this area were initially designated for the construction of a large shopping centre.

That would mean having to start conversations with the Town Hall from scratch, whereby further delaying the resolution of the problem. It would also have to deal with land buyers invoking clauses that allow them to break contracts and deprive the whole neighbourhood of a new school that the almost 10,000 residents are anxiously awaiting, given the lack of educational provisions in the area.

Original story: El Confidencial (by Ruth Ugalde)

Translation: Carmel Drake

Saint Croix Acquires Blanco Store On c/Goya For €15M

13 February 2017 – Eje Prime

Saint Croix, the Socimi owned by the Colomer family, has won the bid to acquire the Blanco store located on Calle Goya in Madrid. The company has spent €15 million on the premises, which several other investors, including Jesús Antúnez, also bid for. Antúnez came close to winning, but Saint Croix took the prize in the end.

The Socimi owned by the Colomer family (which also owns the real estate developer Pryconsa) has spent €15.25 million acquiring the property, which has a gross leasable area of 863 m2. In other words, it has paid a price equivalent to more than 17,600/m2. The company has also acquired two parking spaces as part of the operation.

Until now, the premises were owned by the real estate arm of the former owner of the Madrilenian chain Blanco (which specialises in fashion retail), namely, Inversiones Blasol. The company, whose administrator is Bernardo Blanco Moreno (son of the founder of the Blanco fashion chain) and which was constituted in 19991 with the corporate purpose of leasing real estate assets, filed for voluntary creditors’ bankruptcy in December 2014 in Commercial Court number 10 of Madrid. The company is now in the middle of negotiating its bankruptcy arrangement.

Inversiones Blasol has several other assets up for sale, including a store on Calle Pelai, 1 in Barcelona. That establishment has a commercial area of 200 m2. Jesús Antúnez also bid for those premises, and sources consulted by Eje Prime report that he offered €4 million.

According to the most recent results filed by the company, as at 30 September 2016, the Socimi had a portfolio comprising 209 assets, worth €339.26 million. They include retail premises, such as the Zara store on Conde de Peñalver (Madrid) and several supermarkets leased to Día; office buildings such as CLH’s headquarters on Calle Titán; and several four- and five-star hotels on Isla Canela (Huelva), managed by chains such as Iberostar, Meliá and Barceló.

Original story: Eje Prime

Translation: Carmel Drake

Socimi Saint Croix Obtains €11.4M Loan From Banca March

23 January 2017 – Expansión

The listed company owned by the Colomer family, which also control the real estate company Pryconsa, has mortgaged one of its assets by way of guarantee for this loan, which has a maximum term of 14 years.

This long term loan from Banca March will allow the Socimi to continue with its business plans, which include managing properties worth more than €300 million.

Saint Croix is the vehicle through which the owners of Pryconsa, one of the few traditional real estate companies in the sector that survived the crisis, are managing their personal wealth.

At the end of September 2016, the Colomer’s Socimi owned a portfolio containing 209 assets, worth €339.26 million. They included retail premises, such as a Zara store on Conde de Peñalver (Madrid) and several supermarkets leased to Día; offices buildings such as the headquarters of CLH on Calle Titán; as well as a large portfolio of hotels, including five 4-star and 5-star hotels on Isla Canela (Huelva), managed by hotel chains such as Iberostar, Meliá and Barceló.

During the first nine months of 2016, Saint Croix earned €10.46 million, 18% less than during the same period a year earlier, after generating turnover of €13 million, down by 5% compared to the same period in 2015.

Original story: Expansión (by Rocío Ruiz)

Translation: Carmel Drake